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Home / Sport / From the Archives, 1950: Dave Sands thrashes American Henry Brimm

From the Archives, 1950: Dave Sands thrashes American Henry Brimm

When Brimm had been saved by the bell in the first round, while the third count was being applied, Police-Inspector Hall, on duty at the ringside, rapped the floor of the ring and directed Henneberry’s attention to Brimm’s helpless condition.

Henneberry heeded the warning indication and acted quickly in the second round, without further police intervention.

Henneberry had interrupted the second count in the first round when Sands had charged out from the furthest corner when only five seconds had been called.

Australian Boxer Dave Sands has American Henry Brimm on the ropes before knocking him out in round two at the Sydney Stadium in Rushcutters Bay on August 7, 1950.

Australian Boxer Dave Sands has American Henry Brimm on the ropes before knocking him out in round two at the Sydney Stadium in Rushcutters Bay on August 7, 1950.Credit:Kenneth Issitt

The remaining three seconds of the compulsory count of “eight” were not counted until and had returned to the corner.

The interruption prevented Sands from winning in that first round, as eventually the bell saved Brimm on the third knock-down.

Many in the big crowd of 11,000 showed mixed emotions – delight at the emphatic victory by Sands, who had displayed a”killer” instinct, and annoyance because the referee had stopped the fight.

Many angry ringsiders had paid £2/1/7 for the 3m 45s which the one-sided bout occupied.

But Referee Henneberry acted correctly on each occasion that he intervened firstly, when he interrupted a count and, secondly, when he refused to allow the defenceless Brimm to be slaughtered.

Terrific Hook

Trainer Tom Maguire adjusts Dave Sands' tapes before a workout at Newcastle prior to the Stadium bout with American Henry Brimm, August 3, 1950.

Trainer Tom Maguire adjusts Dave Sands’ tapes before a workout at Newcastle prior to the Stadium bout with American Henry Brimm, August 3, 1950.

Sands weighed list 11st 7¾lb, and Brimm 11st 5½lb.

Sands had paved the way to victory with a terrific left hook that produced the first knock-down just before two minutes of the first round had elapsed.

Sands had begun aggressively, swinging hard lefts, while Brimm poked out tentative left leads. Brimm rose quickly after that superb hook and stayed up for the count of “eight.” Sands, fighting furiously, had him on the floor again from a battery of blows, but Brimm, although groggy, again got up quickly. The count was interrupted at”five” until Sands, eager to get to his victim, had again retired to the corner.

Six seconds before the end of the round, Brimm, who had been hanging on desperately while Sands pounded away, was again knocked down, being saved by the bell.

Brimm came out gamely, but unsteadily, for the second round. Soon, Sands half-pushed him with a left and then swung aright. Brimm collapsed to the floor, and the referee stopped the fight without beginning a count.

Punched Wildly

Sands, in his eagerness, had punched wildly in this round. But the end was inevitable. Generally, Sands in the brief bout was much more convincing than in his 12-round contest with Carl Olson last March, when his timing had gone all awry.

His manager, Tom Maguire, said: “I am hoping’to have something ‘big’ fixed for Dave by the end of the week.

“I expect to be talking to Jack Solomons, in London, by radio telephone, tomorrow, and to Lew Burston, at Madison Square Garden, New York, on Thursday.

“I am hoping to get Dave a world middleweight title fight. If he cannot yet meet the champion, La Motta, then I hope his opponent will be “Sugar” Ray Robinson. I won’t care where the fight is – New York or London.

The 27-year-old Brimm did not look a good fighter last night. But in truth he had very little chance to show his worth after that left hook had rocked him.

American boxers and managers who crowded the dressing room to sympathise with the dejected and still bewildered Brimm, thought enough of Sands’s showing to rate him a certain winner of the world middleweight crown if given a match with La Motta.

Freddie Dawson said: “What a peach of a left hook! Dave’s improvement since I saw him beat American George Henry twice on points here in 1947 is amazing.”

Referee Bill Henneberry after the fight said that he had warned the boxers in their dressing rooms before the fight that they must retire to the “furthest corner” in the event of scoring a knock-down.

They would be obliged to stay there until the compulsory count of “eight,” or the full count of 10 seconds, had been completed.

Henneberry added: “I had counted only ‘five’ when Sands came from the furthest corner ready to pounce upon Brimm.

“I had no option but to interrupt the count until Sands had again retired to the corner.”

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