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When your supermarket’s setting a green energy target, you know it means business

Scott Morrison likes to tell stories about his visits to Bunnings to build cubby houses for his children. Perhaps next time he’s a customer he might also ask for advice on how to leave a safe climate for his kids too.

In recent weeks we’ve seen massive new emissions reductions commitments from Australia’s key trading partners China and Japan. And the election of Joe Biden means the United States is back in the game. The European Union and Britain have legislated climate goals.

Powering head on renewables ... Woolworth is the latest corporation to commit to 100 per cent green energy by 2025.

Powering head on renewables … Woolworth is the latest corporation to commit to 100 per cent green energy by 2025.
Credit:Jim Rice

In Australia, the states are doing all the running so far – and that includes those with Liberal governments. From South Australia’s 100 per cent renewable energy target to Tasmania’s 200 per cent renewables by 2040 target, not to mention NSW’s $32 billion energy commitments, Victoria’s big battery and Queensland’s renewable energy zones, the states are streaking ahead.

And then there’s the corporate sector. Morrison likes to present as an ordinary Aussie bloke, so presumably he’s noticed that all of the big breweries, Telstra, supermarkets Woolworths and Aldi and even Australia’s most trusted brand Bunnings have all committed in recent weeks to using only 100 per cent renewable electricity by 2025 or earlier. Australia’s business leaders, even “Twiggy” Forrest of mining giant Fortescue Metals, are making rapid shifts to focus their business on renewables.

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