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Majority of voters back vaccine passports, mandatory jabs for high-risk workers

More than two-thirds of Australians support vaccine passports, mandatory jabs for high-risk workers and locking people out of workplaces and hospitality venues if they refuse to get the jab.

Vaccine passports and in some sectors mandatory vaccinations are shaping as a key element of the path out of lockdowns and a return to normal life, and an exclusive Resolve Political Monitor survey for The Sun-Herald and The Sunday Age indicates majority support for such moves.

The poll found 82 per cent of people agreed or strongly agreed that “high-risk occupations, like aged care or quarantine, should require workers to be vaccinated”. Aged care workers will need to have at least one jab from September 17, while in NSW it will be mandatory for teachers from November.

Aged care staff need to be vaccinated by September 17.

Aged care staff need to be vaccinated by September 17.Credit:Bloomberg

Vaccine passports enjoy similar strong support, with 73 per cent of people either agreeing or strongly agreeing that “a vaccine passport or certificate to prove you have had a jab is a good idea”.

Sixty-seven per cent agreed or strongly agreed that “if people choose not to vaccinate, venues or workplaces should also be able to not let them in”. And 63 per cent agreed or strongly agreed hospitality venues such as restaurants, cafes and pubs should be able to insist customers were vaccinated before they were allowed to enter.

Australians are more cautious about making COVID-19 vaccination mandatory for everyone, with 48 per cent of people agreeing or strongly agreeing with that statement, 24 per cent undecided and 28 per cent of people disagreeing or strongly disagreeing.

Meanwhile, 51 per cent of people agreed “it is right that individuals should have the choice of whether to be vaccinated or not”, while 22 per cent were neutral or undecided and 26 per cent disagreed or strongly disagreed.

On the question of when Australia should begin to open its border, 49 per cent of people surveyed agreed or strongly agreed that “once vaccination rates reach 70-80 per cent, we should also start opening up our international borders”.

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